Dogs Can Become Babies Best Friends Too

Having a dog is like having a child in your house, they are so adorable, loyal, fun and sometimes annoying but we still love them. However when the real baby comes along, as a dog owner it is normal to become very wary of the dog. So before you stock up on baby gear, you need to make sure you family pet is ready for the transition. Regardless of how much the dog is trained or how well mannered they are you will still be worried about how they will react towards your baby. Will they be aggressive or will they enjoy the moment with you? These are the tough questions that run through your mind.

You need not to worry, dogs are very cleaver. When properly introduced to the new bundle of joy they may become ”siblings” and best friends in a short amount of time and you will not have to worry when the dog is around the baby. Here are some cleaver tricks you can adopt in order to ensure you introduce your dog to your baby safely.

1. Prepare the dog for the baby before bringing the baby home.

Train the dog how to react when the baby comes home instead of surprising the dog with the baby. Teach them the new boundaries that they can’t cross and things they can’t do before the baby comes. A good example is training the dog not to enter the baby’s room or bite on the baby’s toys.

2. Introduce the baby to the dog slowly.

If the dog is not used to having a baby in the house they may become surprised and curious too when they reach home, if this is not properly handled things may get out of hand and the dog may pose some kind of danger to the baby. Introducing the dog to the babies scent before formally physically introducing the two is a good idea, this can be done by allowing the dog to sniff some of the babies clothes or blankets.

3. Play baby noises on videos and on tapes.

As stated above surprising the dog with a new baby is probably not a good idea. Playing baby tapes with their sound’s either crying or playing before the baby comes home will help the dog get used to the babies crying or playing noise instead of surprising them with a noise they are not used to.

4. Don’t stop paying attention to the dog.

A dog has feelings too. Try to balance the amount of attention you give to the dog and the baby. Give the dog same amount of attention you used to give it before the baby came along. If you have to reduce the amount of attention due to the needs of the baby you have to do it gradually instead of abruptly reducing the attention. You can also pay attention to both of them while at the same time introducing the two together as you play with both the baby and the dog.

5. Try introducing the dog to other kids before the baby comes.

Before the baby comes home try as much as possible to introduce the dog to other kids and let them play together. The dog will get used to kids and not grown ups alone, this will make the introduction to your baby much more easier.

6. Read the dogs reaction towards the baby.

Understanding your dog’s reaction towards the baby will help you understand which method to use when introducing the dog to the baby. In case the dog becomes aggressive towards the baby you will have to set up more restrictions and introduce the two slowly, if the dog warms up to the baby it becomes easy to introduce the dog to the baby.

7. Teach the baby how to handle the dog.

When the dog and the baby understand each other their relationship is likely to flourish. Just like dogs, babies too do not know how to handle a dog. Teaching them things to avoid like throwing toys at the dog will go a long way in strengthening their relationship.

8. Reward the dog with treats for behaving and treating the baby well.

Rewarding a dog for good behaviour only encourages them to behave better towards the baby, this will make things easier for you.

Conclusion.

As a parent your child’s safety should be your priority, regardless of the dogs reaction towards the baby you should not leave the baby with the dog alone without any form of. supervision. Babies are very fragile and completely trusting the dog with your baby should not be an option.

Where is the Line Drawn Between Humans and Pets?

You see it especially with hollywood. They have started the trend by dressing their pooches in clothing that resembles their own or that of an offspring they might have. Their pets have sweaters with matching hats and booties. They are carried in fashionable carrying cases or pocketbooks that allow them to be seen, adored and traveled. They are bought collars that cost more than what most pay for their mortgages and groomed better than a lot of people groom themselves.

Just recently Mariah Carey was shot with one of her animal children wearing a full ensemble that included a coat with a fur trimmed hood. I’m sure the trim was made of the finest fake fur stuff out there. The dog looked as if it were in absolute heaven from the great care and life it was receiving. He must have been a peasant in his last life. It doesn’t leave much room to wonder why there would be no room for a man or other children in the same picture.

On the Hogan reality show there was a recent episode I watched where Hogan’s wife Linda decided she would add a nice little chimp to her already too many dogs to count collection. Of course chimps are about as human as you can get. It had to wear a diaper, be fed with a “ba-ba”, entertained and loved just as a human baby would be. It had to be separated from the dogs in order for it to not suffer from any anxiety, confusion or upset. All of the dogs were put outside while the nice new chimp got to enjoy all of the love, affection and roaming of the mansion. In the end, the need for “a baby in the house” was outweighed by the lack of time, effort and energy that needed to be given for it’s care. There were many tears, but in the end Linda’s “momma days” were ultimately over.

There are luxury pet resorts and hotels with pampering poochy service. They are treated to five star doggie meals and exercise regimens. You can take your loved one to get their picture made or even maybe have them stuffed in order to keep them by your fireplace forever. The list of things to do with and for your child, excuse me…pet, are endless when you have too much time or money on your hands. I will say however they are definitely less expensive than an actual human. They still don’t take the same time, attention and care. The don’t talk back and are always happy to see you, even if you didn’t take them on trips to Disneyland or you and their daddy split. I suppose if more people got a furry creature in order to fulfill their need to love and to be loved rather than having a hairless one, it would decrease the population, as much need for lawyers or extra bedrooms.

Miniature Shar-Pei Glossory

Abdomen: The portion of the dog’s body between the chest and the hindquarters.

Amyloidosis: A genetic disease, often resulting in renal (kidney) failure.

Angulation: The angles formed by a meeting of the bones; mainly the shoulder, upper arm, stifle, and hock.

Balanced: A consistent whole; symmetrical, typically proportioned as a whole or as regards its separate parts; i.e., balance of head, balance of body, or balance of head and body.

Bear Coat: A coat length in excess of one inch.

Bench Show: A dog show at which the dogs competing for prizes are required to remain during the entire show.

Best of Breed (BOB): A dog-show award to the dog adjudged best of all dogs/bitches present during a show. In the MSPCA Top Ten, this means the dog/bitch who received the most points during the showing season.

Best of Winners (BOW): A dog-show award to the dog adjudged best between the Winners Dog and Winners Bitch.

Best Opposite Sex (BOS): A dog-show award to the dog of the opposite sex of the BOB.

Best Opposite Sex Puppy (BOSP): A dog-show award to the puppy of the opposite sex of Best Puppy.

Best Puppy (BP): A dog-show award to a puppy adjudged best of all puppies present during a show.

Bitch: A female dog.

Bite: The relative position of the upper and lower teeth when the mouth is closed. The MSPCA standard requires a scissors bite.

Body: The anatomical section between the forequarters and the hindquarters.

Body Length: Distance from the point of the should to the rearmost projection of the upper thigh (point of the buttocks).

Bone: The relative size (girth) of a dog’s leg bones. Substance.

Brisket: The forepart of the body below the chest, between the forelegs, closest to the ribs.

Brood Bitch: A female used for breeding.

Brush Coat: Not to exceed one inch in length.

Canines: The two upper and two lower sharp-pointed teeth next to the incisors. Fangs.

Carpals: Bones of the pastern joints.

Castrate: To remove the testicles of the male dog.

Champion (CH): A prefix used with the name of a dog that has been recorded a Champion by the MSPCA as a result of defeating a specified number of dogs in specified competition at a series of MSPCA approved dog shows.

Choke Collar: A leather or chain collar fitted to the dog’s neck in suck a manner that the degree of tension exerted by the and tightens or loosens it.

Close-Coupled: Comparatively short from withers to hipbones.

Coat: The dog’s hair covering.

Cobby: Short-bodied, compact.

Compact: Term used to describe the firmly joined union of various body parts.

Conformation: The form and structure, make and shape; arrangement of the parts in conformance with breed-standard demands.

Congenital: An inherited feature present at birth.

Cow-Hocked: When the hocks turn toward each other.

Croup: The back part of the back, above the hind legs.

Cryptorchid: The adult whose testicles are abnormally retained in the abdominal cavity. Bilateral cryptorchidism involves both sides, that is, neither testicle has descended into the scrotum. Unilateral cryptorchidism involves one side only; that is, one testicle is retained or hidden, and one descended.

Dam: The female parent.

Dewclaw: An extra claw or functionless digit on the inside of the leg, a rudimentary fifth toe.

Dewlap: Loose, pendulous skin under the throat.

Dilute: A dog without any black pigment.

Disqualification: A decision made by a judge or by a bench show committee following a determination that a dog has a condition that makes it ineligible for any further completion under the dog show rules or under the standard for it’s breed.

Dog: A male dog; also used collectively to designate both male and female.

Dog Show: A competitive exhibition for dogs at which the dogs are judged in accordance with an established standard of perfection.

Dog Show, Conformation: An event held under MSPCA/AKC rules at which championship points are awarded.

Down in Pastern: Weak or faulty pastern (metacarpus) set at a pronounced angle from the vertical.

Drive: A solid thrusting of the hindquarters, denoting sound locomotion.

East-West Front: Incorrectly positioned pasterns that cause the feet to turn outwards, usually associated with a narrow front.

Elbows Out: Turning out or off from the body; not held close.

Expression: The general appearance of all features of the head as viewed from the front and as typical of the breed.

Femur: Thigh bone, extends from hip to stifle.

Fibula: The outer and smaller of the two bones of the lower thigh.

Fiddle Front: Forelegs out at elbows, pasterns close, and feet turned out.

Flank: The side of the body between the last rib and the hip.

Flews: Upper lips pendulous, particularly at their inner corners

Foreface: The front part of the head, before the eyes. Muzzle.

Forequarters: The combined front assembly from its uppermost component, the shoulder blade, down to the feet.

Front: The forepart of the body as viewed head on; i.e., forelegs, chest, brisket, and shoulder line.

Gait: The pattern of footsteps at various rates of speed, each pattern distinguished by a particular rhythm and footfall.

Hackles: Hair on neck and back raised involuntarily in fright or anger.

Handler: A person who handles a dog in the show ring.

Haw: A third eyelid or membrane in the inside corner of the eye.

Heat: Seasonal period of the female. Estrus.

Height: Vertical measurement from the withers to the ground; referred to usually as shoulder height.

Hindquarters: Rear assembly of dog (pelvis, thighs, hocks and paws).

Hock: The tarsus or collection of bones of the hind leg forming the joint between the second thigh and the metatarsus; the dog’s true heel.

Hocks Well Let Down: Hock joints close to the ground.

Horse Coat: A harsh coat not to exceeding Ľ inch in length.

Inbreeding: The mating of closely related dogs of the same breed.

Incisors: The six upper and six lower front teeth between the canines. Their point of contact forms the “bite”.

Iris: The colored membrane surrounding the pupil of the eye.

Judge: The arbiter in the dog show ring.

Knee Joint: Stifle joint.

Layback: The angle of the shoulder blade as compared with the vertical.

Lead: A strap, cord, or chain attached to the collar or harness for the purpose of restraining or leading the dog. Leash.

Level Gait: Dog moves without rise or fall of withers.

Line Breeding: The mating of related dogs of the same breed, within the line or family, to a common ancestor, as, for example, a dog to his granddam or a bitch to her grandsire.

Litter: A puppy or puppies of one whelping.

Loin: Region of the body on either side of the vertebral column between the last ribs and the hindquarters.

Mask: Dark shading on the foreface.

Mate: To breed a dog and bitch.

Metatarsus: Rear pastern.

Monorchid: A unilateral cryptorchid.

Moving Straight: Term descriptive of balance gaiting in which angle of inclination begins at the shoulder, or hip joint, and limbs remain relatively straight from these points to the pad of the feet, even as the legs flex or extend in reaching or thrusting.

Muzzle: The head in front of the eyes – nasal bone, nostrils, and jaws. Foreface.

Occiput: Upper, back point of the skull.

Open Class: A class at dog shows in which all dogs of a breed may compete.

Outcrossing: The mating of unrelated individuals of the same breed.

Overreaching: Fault in the trot caused by more angulation and drive from behind than in front, so that the rear feet are forced to step in one side of the forefeet to avoid interfering or clipping.

Pads: Tough, shock-absorbing projections on the underside of the feet. Soles.

Parent Club: National club for the breed.

Pastern: Commonly recognized as the region of the foreleg between the carpus or wrist and the digits.

Pedigree: The written record of a dog’s descent of three generations or more.

Prick Ear: Carried erect.

Professional Handler: A person who shows dogs for a fee

Puppy: A dog under twelve months of age.

Pure-Bred: A dog whose sire and dam belong to the same breed, and are themselves of unmixed descent since recognition of the breed.

Reach of Front: Length of forward stride taken by forelegs without wasted or excessive motion.

Register: To record a dog’s breeding particulars.

Reserve Winners Bitch: The runner up to Winners Bitch

Reserve Winners Dog: The runner up to Winners Dog

Roach Back: A convex curvature of the back toward the loin.

Sable: A lacing of black hairs over a lighter ground color.

Scissors Bite: A bite in which the outer side of the lower incisors touches the inner side of the upper incisors.

Septum: The line extending vertically between the nostrils.

Sire: The male parent.

Soundness: The state of mental and physical health when all organs and faculties are complete and functioning normally, each in its rightful relation to the other.

Spay: To perform a surgical operation on the bitch’s reproductive organs to prevent conception.

Splayfoot: A flat foot with toes spreading. Open foot, open-toes.

Square Body: A dog whose measurements from withers to the ground equals that from point of shoulder to the rearmost projection of the upper thigh.

Stance: Manner of standing.

Standard: A description of the ideal dog of a breed, to serve as a word pattern by which dogs are judged at shows.

Stifle: The joint of the hind leg between the thigh and the second thigh. The dog’s knee.

Stop: The step up from muzzle to skull; indentation between the eyes where the nasal bone and skull meet.

Straight Hocked: Lacking appreciable angulation at the hock joints. Straight behind.

Straight In Pastern: Little or no bend between joint and foot.

Stud Book: A record of the breeding particulars of dogs of recognized breeds.

Stud Dog: A male dog used for breeding purposes.

Substance: Bone.

Tail Set: How the base of the tail sets on the rump.

Testicles: The male gonad, gland which produces spermatozoa.

Topline: The dog’s outline from just behind the withers to the tail set.

Trot: A rhythmic two-beat diagonal gait in which the feet at diagonally opposite ends of the body strike the ground together; i.e., right hind with the left front and left hind with the right front.

Tuck-Up: Characterized by markedly shallower body depth at the loin. Small waisted.

Type: The charasteristic qualities distinguishing a breed, the embodiment of a standard’s essentials.

Undershot: The front teeth (incisors) of the lower jaw overlapping or projecting beyond the front teeth of the upper jaw when the mouth is closed.

Whelping: The act of giving birth.

Whipped Tail: Carried out stiffly straight.

Winners Bitch: An award given at dog shows to the best female competing in regular classes.

Winners Dog: An award given at dog shows to the best male competing in regular classes.